Exercise scientist makes moves for teaching

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Exercise scientist makes moves for teaching

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18 October 2019

A USC exercise science graduate is using the latest knowledge in exercise physiology and biomechanics to teach Bundaberg school children agility, balance, coordination and speed.

Jacob Hohn graduated from USC recently with a degree in Sport and Exercise Science and is working as an assistant coach at St Luke’s Anglican College, helping students to improve their performance in sport and recreation.

With a career goal of becoming a secondary science and physical education teacher, the 22-year-old said he chose the degree specialising in the science and theory behind human movement and sporting performance as a pathway to a Master of Education.

“I believed this path would help me to gain extensive hands-on skills, knowledge and experience,” said the keen sportsperson, whose interests include rugby, touch football, surfing and motorbikes.

USC’s three-year degree covers areas such as functional anatomy, motor control and learning, exercise physiology, biomechanics, sports psychology, performance analysis, coaching and exercise rehabilitation.

Students complete at least 270 hours of supervised professional practice that includes hands-on experience of testing and training athletes in USC’s nationally accredited sports science labs.

“My placements at the USC Gym and at Matthew Flinders Anglican College at Buderim were some of the best experiences for my growth during the degree,” said Jacob who received a University Commendation for Academic Excellence when he graduated.

“Being able to now apply the theory I have learned and utilise practical components such as exercise prescription and programming to help improve performance is fantastic.

“Having a large repertoire of exercises helps you to be adaptable during coaching sessions and to keep the students motivated.”

Jacob said his knowledge of physiology and biomechanics also helped with communicating to students how each exercise should feel and how the body should move.

Teaching runs in the family for Jacob, who plans to begin USC’s two-year Master of Education next year.

“Both of my parents are primary school teachers in Bundaberg and my placement at Matthew Flinders College and my recent work at St Luke’s has reinforced how much I enjoy working with students,” he said.

“It is great seeing how they respond to the activities and helping them physically and mentally overcome obstacles.

“They are all so positive and want to achieve which makes the job very rewarding.”

Applications are open to study at USC next year.

— Clare McKay

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